Dan Foster

TopoGrafix
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About Dan Foster

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    Author of ExpertGPS and EasyGPS

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  • geocaching.com username
    topografix

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    http://www.topografix.com
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    Male
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    Stow, MA, USA
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    Writing GPS Software!

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  1. Click Add and Calibrate a New Scanned Map, and select the .tif file. If the .tfw file is in the same directory as the .tif, ExpertGPS will do most of the calibration for you.
  2. The Automatically Add USGS Topo Map command in the latest version of ExpertGPS should allow you to download many of the historical topos. I left out the really old ones, but if you need them, you can download them through this interface: https://ngmdb.usgs.gov/maps/TopoView/
  3. Are they all the same size, and do they align perfectly if you simply place them side-by-side? Or does there need to be some manual intervention or image recognition to overlap them properly? Can you get them as 256x256 tiles in a web Mercator projection?
  4. I'm revising the help file this month. To create your route, either start connecting waypoints or drawing new ones with the Route tool, or if there are no routes in your GPX file yet, select one or more waypoints, right-click, and Add Waypoints to Route. Empty routes (and empty tracks and shapes) can cause problems with a number of different file formats, so ExpertGPS now tries to avoid creating them, and removes them when importing data.
  5. You will get higher accuracy when you record tracks and waypoints using a modern GPS receiver that uses GLONASS as well as GPS. The Satellite View in the Tracking feature in ExpertGPS will display both GPS and GLONASS satellites when connected to a Garmin GLO or other similar GPS antenna.
  6. Both programs can send waypoints, tracks, and routes to and from your computer. Additionally, ExpertGPS can send street maps, topo maps, aerial photos, and your own scanned maps to your Montana as a custom map overlay. One of the most useful features of your Garmin GPS is the ability to display ExpertGPS scanned maps, topo maps, and aerial photos, as a Custom Map on your GPS screen. You can optionally choose to include any data overlay from ExpertGPS, including any waypoints or trails you've drawn, and even overlay complex infrastructure from GIS or CAD files to refer to when you're out in the field. ExpertGPS can export any map or data set in this format. To use the feature, click Send Map to GPS on the GPS menu, set the size of the map you want to export (keep it under 10,000 x 10,000 pixels) and click Send Map. ExpertGPS will create a tiled map set that will display on your GPS, and can also be viewed in Google Earth. You need to then copy this .kmz file to the /Garmin/CustomMaps folder on your GPS receiver's microSD card. Don't put the maps directly on your GPS's GARMIN drive. Put them on the removable data card. That way, if for any reason the GPS doesn't like the custom map, you can just remove the data card to start your GPS. You should also double-click the generated .kmz file and verify that it displays correctly in Google Earth before transferring the kmz to your GPS data card. More information on the Custom Maps feature in ExpertGPS is available here: http://forums.topografix.com/index.php?showtopic=2419
  7. The USGS took down their seamless scanned topo maps. They stopped making "classic" topo maps several years ago. I agree that their replacement "US Topo" maps are less usable for many applications. I'm working on two alternatives: 1. The Automatically Add USGS Topo Map command (Map menu, Scanned Maps sub-menu). This got a big refresh in mid-December 2016, and now allows you download every edition of the topo maps for your location. There are over 100 thousand maps available through this command. Unfortunately, I've found a few typos and broken URLs in the list of maps that ExpertGPS is using, so if you get errors, please use the automatic error reporting feature or send me an email with the location and the name and year of the map you were trying to load. 2. I'm making changes to the cartography used in the Street Map view to make it more usable for planning outdoor activities. (more emphasis on contour lines, trails, etc)
  8. There's some code in ExpertGPS that tries to prevent mid-word matches, so if you type "can" in the Find box, it will match Canada, but not Vatican. I've tweaked it for the next release to handle your ":16:" searches better.
  9. To install ExpertGPS on a second computer, or to move ExpertGPS from a computer you are replacing to a new computer, follow these instructions: 1. Locate your ExpertGPS license email. If you need a copy of your license emailed to you, visit http://www.expertgps.com/regcode.asp 2. Install the latest version of ExpertGPS on your new computer: http://www.expertgps.com/SetupExpertGPS.exe 3. Run ExpertGPS, and click Enter Registration Code on the Help menu. Enter your license information, and restart ExpertGPS. If you have ExpertGPS settings on your old computer that you'd like to bring forward, you can transfer your settings files by following these instructions: http://www.expertgps.com/transfer-settings.asp You can also transfer your downloaded map tiles: http://blog.expertgps.com/blog/2008/12/how-to-copy-expertgps-maps-to-your-laptop/
  10. For now, click Automatically Add USGS Topo Map on the Map menu, under Scanned Maps.
  11. ExpertGPS doesn't work with .at5 files. ExpertGPS can read and write .usr files from your Lowrance GPS.
  12. There are very few maps out there that use an Equirectangular projection. (Tom's Delorme Gazetteer may be an exception - I've got one on order to confirm.) If you encounter any, I'd love to see them. Use Mercator as your default going forward. If you find a map that seems mis-aligned toward the corners when you do a two-point calibration using the new version of ExpertGPS, send me the details.
  13. ExpertGPS 5.83 fixes the issues with scanned maps that used the Equirectangular projection. http://www.expertgps.com/latest.asp
  14. oregon 550t

    Your Oregon can display custom image-based maps. ExpertGPS can layer GPS, waypoint, and GIS data over a basemap you choose (topo, street, aerial, your own historical topos), and composite that together into one custom map for your Oregon. One of the most useful features of your Garmin GPS is the ability to display ExpertGPS scanned maps, topo maps, and aerial photos, as a Custom Map on your GPS screen. You can optionally choose to include any data overlay from ExpertGPS, including any waypoints or trails you've drawn, and even overlay complex infrastructure from GIS or CAD files to refer to when you're out in the field. ExpertGPS can export any map or data set in this format. To use the feature, click Send Map to GPS on the GPS menu, set the size of the map you want to export (keep it under 10,000 x 10,000 pixels) and click Send Map. ExpertGPS will create a tiled map set that will display on your GPS, and can also be viewed in Google Earth. You need to then copy this .kmz file to the /Garmin/CustomMaps folder on your GPS receiver's microSD card. Don't put the maps directly on your GPS's GARMIN drive. Put them on the removable data card. That way, if for any reason the GPS doesn't like the custom map, you can just remove the data card to start your GPS. You should also double-click the generated .kmz file and verify that it displays correctly in Google Earth before transferring the kmz to your GPS data card. More information on the Custom Maps feature in ExpertGPS is available here: http://forums.topografix.com/index.php?showtopic=2419
  15. Map projections are what turn "world" coordinates on a round Earth into "map" coordinates on a flat map. The differences between them are most visible when you're mapping the entire Earth onto a flat map. Some projections make polar regions look huge. Some are better for sailing and flying because the "best" route over the ocean is a straight line on the map. Some, like Mercator and Equirectangular, don't have any parameters for you to tweak, and others (Transverse Mercator) have a whole list of parameters that you need to know to use them successfully (these usually get printed in the margin of the map). The good news is that for maps that cover small areas (towns, counties, national parks), the differences between the projections are pretty negligible. You're mapping a relatively-flat patch of the Earth onto a flat piece of paper or a digital map. My rules of thumb for selecting a projection to use in the Scanned Maps dialog if you don't know the projection used by the map maker: - if the projection info is printed on the map collar, use that. - if the map has grid lines (UTM, or a national grid), use that projection, especially if the grid lines are exactly vertical and horizontal on the map. - if you have ExpertGPS Pro, select the state plane or national grid format for that location. - if not, select UTM and enter the UTM zone number for that location. - if the map crosses a UTM zone boundary, or you can't be bothered to remember what zone you're in, use Mercator. A simpler approach might be: use the default Mercator for everything, and if the grid lines in ExpertGPS don't cover up the grid lines printed on the map, or you can't get a good two-point calibration, use the rules above to correct things.